At South-View Cemetery, Winifred Watts Hemphill is Keeper of Black Atlanta’s Departed History

By  Adina Solomon August 9, 2018   While Winifred Watts Hemphill was growing up in Durham, North Carolina, dinner discussions often revolved around funerals. Her grandmother, who lived with her family, had the Atlanta Constitution delivered to Durham. After all, she needed to check on business at South-View Cemetery, one

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Why Black History Month Still Matters in 2017

Gretel Kauffman February 2, 2017 —Wednesday marked the start of Black History Month, the annual event dedicated to the study and celebration of centuries of African American contributions and experiences. Does this celebration, officially begun 41 years ago, hold more – or less – relevance today? As the country grapples

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U.S. Owes Black People Reparations for a History of ‘Racial Terrorism’

By Ishaan Tharoor September 27 The history of slavery in the United States justifies reparations for African Americans, argues a recent report by a U.N.-affiliated group based in Geneva. This conclusion was part of a study by the United Nations’ Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent, a body

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The National Civil Rights Museum Opens – July 4, 1991

The National Civil Rights Museum officially opened at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tenn., the site of the assassination of civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr. The National Civil Rights Museum is a complex of museums and historic buildings in Memphis, Tennessee; its exhibits trace the history of the

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